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Summer Lacto-Fermented Dill Pickled Cucumbers

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Learn how to make these best fermented pickles with step by step instructions. These cucumbers are pickled in brine with garlic and dill.

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions in a bowl- close up

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions

I am sitting here looking through my canning recipes from Romania as I need to flood you with some more ideas before the winter comes. I just made this lacto-fermented pickles using a very easy method that is super old.

You see, cucumbers pickled this way are not a new trend. People preserved vegetables in brine for thousands of years.

Our ancestors used to eat a lot of this stuff. Fermented food, if you know how to prepare, it is delicious and good for your digestive system. They knew all about it as every culture around the world has some sort of lacto-fermented food in their cuisine.

These dill pickles get their characteristic tangy flavor through old fashion fermentation. Salt, water, dill, garlic and spices are put together in jars filled with small cucumbers and placed in a warm place for a few days.

The friendly bacterias take over and while they eat the natural sugars in the cucumbers, they produce lactic acid, which will help cucumbers become sour and delicious.

This is a Romanian recipe, but all Eastern European countries pickle cucumbers or other vegetables this way. Europeans brought the recipes to America when migrated and we can be forever grateful and thank them for this treasure.

While cucumbers in vinegar are very popular in America, they are not the best for your health. These fermented pickles in brine are.

Lacto-fermentation,  both pickles and juice are full of gut-health promoting probiotics and homemade pickles are way better than any product you might buy in the stores.

I am visiting Trader Joe’s weekly, because I love the store, it is close to my house and easy to get there. They have jars of lacto-fermented pickles and also sauerkraut, in the refrigerated area, and once in a while I buy them.

However, after making these pickles at home, I have to tell you that they are far superior to the store ones. Might be the love I put in them, for sure.

Just look at them, how can you not fall in love with these beauties?

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions- overhead picture- pickles in a bowl with garlic and dill

In the Romanian cuisine, I saw two different types of pickled cucumbers in brine. One is the summer pickling, and this is what we are making today.

The other type is pickling cucumbers and other vegetables in brine for the winter. Both methods are quite similar.

However, the summer cucumbers are lacto-fermenting outside, in the sun, which takes only a few days, while the ones preserved for the winter will ferment slower, in a cooler place. 

How Romanians use all kinds of vegetables from the garden to pickle before the winter comes:

The process of lacto-fermentation is mostly science. I am sure you are probably familiar with sauerkraut or kimchi. Basically, using this method, you can lacto-ferment any kind of vegetable in the garden.

Before you start asking questions I will tell you what Romanians do in late September-October before the cold comes. 

They use barrels of different sizes and gather together everything that is leftover in the garden: cucumbers, green tomatoes, carrots, cauliflower, peppers, baby water melons, celeriac, horseradish(very important), garlic, onions, small cabbage, apples and quince etc.

Everything gets cleaned up and thrown in that barrel. Salt, water and spices are poured over the vegetables and the waiting time begins.

As there are so many vegetables in the “pool”, the pickling might take a few weeks, as each vegetable takes its own time. It is also cooler outside, so the vegetables ferment slower.

The pickles are submerged in brine the whole entire winter and barrels are kept in a cool place, so the fermentation slows down. The pickles are served with roasted pork, chicken,  potatoes, beans, soups and stews.

How to make this recipe of Summer Lacto-Fermented dill Pickled Cucumbers

This recipe is easy, like super easy!

Step 1.

Gather the ingredients together. For this project you will need small cucumbers. Cucumbers absorb water very easy.

For that matter, you will need small cucumbers that are slightly under-ripe, dark green and firm. Big cucumbers will not pickle properly and you might end up with mushy ones. Not bad, but meh…

If they have spikes, brush them gently to get rid of them.

Trim off the ends as they harbor an enzyme that can make the pickles too soft.

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions- dill and cucumbers- close up

What you will need:

  • small cucumbers
picture of fresh cucumbers
  • onions- cut in small pieces
  • garlic cloves
  • a bunch of bloomed dill
Dill
  • thyme (optional)
  • mustard seeds
  • pickling spices
  • pickling salt (no iodine)– Do not use regular salt unless it is iodine free (iodine is not good for fermentation)
  • non chlorinated water
  • jars (the size of the jar doesn’t matter as long as the cucumbers have enough space in the jar to stay submerged in brine. I used quart, half-gallon, and gallon sizes with success)

Step 2.

Prepare the brine. In a big pot, place water and salt and bring to a boil. 

water and salt simmering on the stove- preparation of brine

Make sure the salt dissolves completely in the water. When the water starts boiling, remove from the heat and let it cool.

Step 3.

Meanwhile, make sure the jars are sparkly clean. Place dill on the bottom of each jar. 

dill on the bottom of a glass jar

Step 4.

Add some pieces of onion, a few garlic cloves, some mustard seeds, thyme and pickling spices.

Start adding cucumbers, leaving at least 2 inches of headspace from the rim of the jar. 

two jars with cucumbers and dill plus chopped onions and garlic on a wooden board

Add more garlic cloves and onions.

jars filled with cucumbers and spices for pickling

Place a bunch of dill over the cucumbers.

jar with cucumbers and spices close up

Step 5.

Pour the brine over the cucumbers and make sure everything is submerged in it.

jar filled with cucumbers, spices and brine - overhead picture

I cut the ends of the dill and add them as little sticks on top of the jar, to push the vegetables inside the brine.

3 glass jars filled with cucumbers, spices and brine

There are different methods to cover the jars. I used a simple one: little plates that I placed on top of the jars.

jars with pickles covered with plates

Some people cover the jars with the lids, but a small plate worked perfectly for me.

If you cover the jar with a lid, make sure to do the following: During the earliest stages of fermentation carbon dioxide is released.

Check your jars once or twice a day to see if the lids are building up pressure. Very quickly and carefully “burp” your jar by slightly unscrewing the lid, allowing a bit of gas to escape, and screwing it back on quickly. 

As I specified before, I did not need to do that, as I placed a small plate over the jar opening.

I put the jars on a baking tray and placed the tray outside on the balcony. Romanians place the jars in the sun, but I don’t have much sun on my balcony.

For that matter, the fermentation happened a little bit slower, in about 6 days. If you place the jars exposed to the sun, they will ferment much faster.

I would suggest you taste the cucumbers after 3 days and see if they are salty and sour. If not, let them be for another day or two until they are ready. 

So, what happened during these 6 days?

This is how the cucumbers looked on the second day:

second day of pickling- glass jar filled with cucumbers and brine that became cloudy

The liquid started to bubble and became a little bit cloudy. This is a good sign as it means that the lactic acid fermentation process started.

The bacterias feast on the vegetables and that creates gases that are released.

Day 4:

The liquid is cloudier, but it smells pleasant and vinegary. One taste of a cucumber made me decide that the batch needs  to sit for another day or two.

4th day of brining cucumbers- jar filled with cucumbers and brine fermenting

Once a day I removed the plate and smelled the liquid. It should be a sour, vinegary aroma combined with the spices, a quite pleasant smell.

Day 6:

day 6 - jar of cucumbers and brine fermenting- cloudy liquid

At this point, the cucumbers were ready for refrigeration. 

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions- in a green bowl

This is how the pickles look inside:

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions-close up

So, are you going to make a batch of pickles this way? Looking at that list of things to do can be intimidating, but I promise you that once you do this a few times and understand the process, it is the easiest way of making pickles that are delicious and healthy for you.

Just make sure you consume these pickles in up to two weeks. 

PIN THIS FOR LATER:

Best fermented Pickles With Step By Step Instructions- featured picture for Pinterest

A Few questions you might have:

Can I keep these jars for months?

No, you cannot. These are fermented vegetables, not canned. Lacto-fermentation is a common and traditional form of pickling vegetables but it is not the same as canning and it is not used for long-term preservation. 

The taste will change over time as the fermentation continues even if you place the pickles in a cold place.

Fermented foods are consumed as soon as they reach the level of fermentation desired and finished in shorts period of time before the flavors change too much.

Canning involves sterilization as the product is designed to last often 6 months or more.

Can I pickle this way some other vegetables? And which ones would be good?

Yes, you can try green tomatoes, carrots, cauliflower, peppers, baby water melons, celeriac,  cabbage, apples, quince etc.

While I am sure there might be other vegetables that can be pickled this way, I recommend you looking for recipes that would teach you how to preserve that specific fruit or vegetables you want to experiment with.

Why is this recipe better than the cucumbers pickled in vinegar?

It is better because it is healthier. The lactic acid in the jars is a natural preservative that inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria.

Lacto-fermentation also increases or preserves the vitamin and enzyme levels of the fermented food.

In addition, lactobacillus organisms are the heroes when it comes to good bacteria in your gut and probiotics.

Fermented cucumbers- What is Normal?

You might get anxiety if your fermented pickles do not look like the home-canned pickles you are used to. Here’s what to expect:

a. Cloudy brine, often getting cloudier as time progresses.

b. Fizziness! Fizzy brine is totally normal and just a sign things are working as they should.

c. Liquid leaking out of the jar. Again, absolutely normal. However, you can sometimes avoid it by making sure you don’t add too much brine to your jars. This is the reason I placed my jars on a bakind tray, just to make sure that it doesn’t become messy.

d. Bubbles equals happy pickles

e. Pleasant sour taste. Fermented pickles have a slightly different tang than vinegar pickles.

Enjoy!

Summer Lacto Fermented Kosher Pickled Cucumbers1717

Summer Lacto-Fermented Dill Pickled Cucumbers

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Additional Time: 6 days
Total Time: 6 days 20 minutes

Learn how to make these incredible delicious and easy Summer Lacto-Fermented Dill Pickled Cucumbers. This is a step by step recipe that will show you how to pickle cucumbers in brine, which is just salt and water. 

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds small cucumbers
  • salt(free of iodine)like pickling salt
  • water- chlorine free
  • 7-8 garlic cloves(if too big slice them in half)
  • 1 medium white onion chopped in small pieces
  • a bunch of dill blossoms
  • 1-2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 2-3 tablespoons pickling spices
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
  • Jars

Instructions

  1. Gather the ingredients together. Use small cucumbers that are slightly under-ripe, dark green and firm. If they have spikes, brush them gently to get rid of them. Trim off the ends.
  2. Prepare the brine. In a big pot, place water and salt and bring to a boil. Rule: For each quart of water, you need 2 tablespoons of salt. Make sure the salt dissolves completely in the water. When the water starts boiling, remove the pot from the heat and let it cool.
  3. Place dill on the bottom of each jar. Add some pieces of onion, few garlic cloves, few mustard seeds, thyme and pickling spices.
  4. Start adding cucumbers, leaving at least 2 inches of headspace from the rim of the jar. Add more garlic cloves and onions. Place a bunch of dill over the cucumbers.
  5. Pour the brine over the cucumbers and make sure everything is submerged in it.
  6. Cut the ends of the dill blossoms and use them as little sticks on top of the jar, to keep the vegetables inside the brine.
  7. Cover the jars with a little plate and place them outside in warm temperatures.
  8. During the earliest stages of fermentation carbon dioxide is released. You will notice the liquid will start bubbling, which is a good sign. In case you seal the jars with the lid, check them once or twice a day to see if the lids are building up pressure. Very quickly and carefully “burp” your jar by slightly unscrewing the lid, allowing a bit of gas to escape, and screwing it back on quickly. If you just cover the jar with a plate, you don't need to do that, just make sure nothing gets inside the jar.
  9. You will notice that the liquid becomes cloudier, this is a sign of lactic acid forming. This is very normal. Allow the fermentation to continue for few days. My batch was ready to refrigerate after 6 days, but keep an eye on the jars and taste the cucumbers after the 3rd day if it is very warm where the jars are sitting. They might get sour faster.
  10. As soon as you are pleased with the texture and taste of the cucumbers, place the jars inside the refrigerator and consume them in the next two weeks.
  11. Serve them with grilled or roasted meats, sausages, burgers, potatoes, stews, soups etc.

Did you make this recipe?

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